Xerox Corp.

At IPEX 98, New Digital Technology
November 1, 1998

BIRMINHAM, UK—Technology innovators in prepress, press and postpress turned their collective attention to England recently as IPEX drew global crowds to this industrial city. Heidelberg rolled out the Speedmaster 74 DI, Screen jumped into the digital press ring with TruePress, Kodak Polychrome Graphics touted Kodak Approval XP4, Scitex marketed its Lotem family of platesetters, and Agfa Div., Bayer Corp., put the spotlight on Thermostar P970 and P971 for 830nm and 1,064nm thermal CTP, respectively. Technology highlights turned to new innovations in color management, thermal CTP, digital offset presses, variable data software enhancements, digital color proofing innovations, new scanning systems, large-format printing solutions, imagesetters and

On-Demand Printing--The Pressure of Offset's Digital Momentum
October 1, 1998

As more digital color presses hit the market, traditional offset operations, like Dallas-based Harper House, are going on-demand. BY MARIE RANOIA ALONSO Is investing in a digital color press the right move for progressive, commercial offset printing operations? Buy now, buy later? Buy what? Buy from whom? Why buy at all? The pressure to purchase a digital color printing device or full-force digital color press is only going to get more intense, as more digital color output products—conceptualized and marketed specifically to bolster today's offset printing operation—hit the market. It seems obvious that today's typical offset printing operation—often rooted in tradition and craftsmanship, and rigidly opposed to

Digital Printing--On-demand Finishing Finesse
October 1, 1998

How profitable are digital press investments? Not very—if on-demand postpress support is lacking. Finish-on-demand is just as important as its glamorous partner, as any on-demand printer can well attest. BY MARIE RANOIA ALONSO The finishing component of on-demand digital printing is every bit as important as is the high-tech print engine that drives the most elite of digital presses. If the finishing finesse is missing, despite the best performance power of the finest digital color press, a digital print job is not only at risk of not being on-demand, but not being on time. As more traditional offset commercial printers and short-run shops go

Digital Presses--Making the Grade
October 1, 1998

The teeming class of digital color presses seems to be on the verge of a graduation of sorts. Xeikon celebrated the shipment of its 1,000th digital color press earlier this year, a DCP/32D. Indigo reports well over 1,000 E-Print shipments globally. Xerox boasts more than 4,000 DocuColor 40 units installed worldwide. Heidelberg's Quickmaster DI continues to flood the market. All this is happening just as Agfa's variable printing Chromapress and the Scitex/KBA-Planeta Karat continue to push the technology forward. But that doesn't mean new classmates, like Screen's recently launched TruePress and the Quickmaster's big brother, the new Speedmaster 74 DI, aren't ready to

On-demand Finishing Finesse
October 1, 1998

How profitable are digital press investments? Not very—if on-demand postpress support is lacking. Finish-on-demand is just as important as its glamorous partner, as any on-demand printer can well attest. BY MARIE RANOIA ALONSO The finishing component of on-demand digital printing is every bit as important as is the high-tech print engine that drives the most elite of digital presses. If the finishing finesse is missing, despite the best performance power of the finest digital color press, a digital print job is not only at risk of not being on-demand, but not being on time. As more traditional offset commercial printers and short-run shops go

'Think Small' Is Service Bureau's Philosphy
September 1, 1998

MIAMI LAKES, FL—The problem: How to increase production volume, offer new services and cut overhead by hundreds of thousands of dollars, all at the same time? The answer, according to Andy Capodiferro, CEO of Laser Computer Graphics, is: think small. Since adopting that philosophy, Capodiferro's service bureau has grown by 60 percent to $1.4 million in gross revenues. "Laser Computer Graphics has been a heavy-iron shop since 1979," says Capodiferro. "We had a high-speed production environment with Xerox 8700 and 9700 laser printers. In 1997, we were about to spend $500,000 to install a new Xerox 4635 laser printing system when we got

Merrick Makes a Connection With Digital Printing
September 1, 1998

LOUISVILLE, KY—As the home of the Kentucky Derby, Louisville is accustomed to long shots. And in 1994, Merrick Printing bet on one of the longest shots of all: digital printing. Despite all of the hoopla surrounding digital printing, this technology does not ensure higher profit margins—as many hapless printers have discovered. Merrick Printing, however, has discovered differently, hitting the jackpot with its digital on-demand services. Digital Print Impressions (DPI), Merrick's digital division, recently moved from a 5,000-square-foot facility to a new 30,000-square-foot home located within the same business park. The larger location provides plenty of room for DPI's six Xerox DocuTechs, two DocuColors

Wide-format Printing Widens the Market
August 1, 1998

Greg and Scott share the same last name (Scinta). They share the same birthday (they're twin brothers). They share the same business (Smash Graphix in Louisville, KY). And they share the same opinion about wide-format printing (it's great). "It certainly makes our life easier," says President Greg. "Money-wise," Vice President Scott chimes in. The Scinta brothers aren't alone in their thinking. When it comes to wide-format printing, many shops are discovering that the market is wide open. When most people think of wide format, they think of signs. Granted, signage is a common, and profitable, application—but it's hardly the only one. With a little

Exploring the Digital World
August 1, 1998

San Francisco—The theme of this year's DocuWorld was "Explore, Discover, Connect," and attendees were able to do just that at the seminars and hands-on demos held throughout the conference. Even CyberStudio, an area on the show flow that provided links to DocuWorld events occurring simultaneously in Toronto and Sao Paulo, Brazil, gave a glimpse of the power of today's technology. The San Francisco show, itself, was divided into three zones, providing a variety of ways for participants to learn more about the newest technologies and opportunities. The Digital Learning Zone featured information-packed sessions hosted by Xerox and other leading companies, as well

Seybold SF--Beyond the Golden Gates, Digital Innovation Awaits
August 1, 1998

BY MARIE RANOIA ALONSO Seybold San Francisco may not have the same prepress hardware punch as its East Coast counterpart, but digital file delivery, digital content manipulation, color management and Internet design tools are enough to get the industry pointed in a Golden Gate direction. What to expect? Count on the show emphasizing content manipulation and color management—from creation through output. Be ready to see a variety of software tools to handle everything from creation of files to data storage, archival and retrieval—not to mention unique enhancements to the movement of repurposing digital content for the World Wide Web. Get ready for a hearty serving of alphabet soup—as