Finishing - Conventional

PRINT 05 Binding & Finishing -- Bound to Please
October 1, 2005

By Erik Cagle Senior Editor Getting customers to stop by their booth was the No. 1 challenge facing manufacturers, suppliers and distributors during PRINT 05 & CONVERTING 05 in Chicago. Be it food, beverages, magicians or professional pool players, those exhibiting knew that getting one's attention was as critical as spreading their company's gospel. This is particularly true for those purveyors of binding and finishing equipment, which offer such a vast array of products and services that it's easy for attentions to get divided. The key was in seeing those attentions get conquered. For example, Standard Finishing Systems and Horizon International made a

BINDERY matters
June 1, 2005

Gämmerler to Build Manufacturing Plant HANOVER PARK, IL—Material handling and inline finishing equipment manufacturer Gämmerler plans to build a 80,000-square-foot manufacturing plant in Palmetto, FL. Scheduled to open in April 2006, company officials say that the new facility will house the latest in automation equipment, provide roughly 35 percent of annual global production capacity and significantly improve Gämmerler's operational efficiency. "The decision to build the new plant was based on an increase in demand for Gämmerler's products in North America and a desire for a more flexible and efficient international manufacturing platform," says Gämmerler CEO Gunter Gämmerler. "The Palmetto plant will complement our existing production

Trade Binderies — Transformation Time
June 1, 2005

Thinking back to when he started out in the industry in the 1980s, Frank Shear, president of Woburn, MA-based Seaboard Bindery, remembers a time when trade binderies were all things to all printers. Only a handful of the largest printers had substantial bindery capabilities back then. Most finishing work was left to the trade shops. “There was a lot of overflow work in those days, and we were able to provide a complete bindery service to most of the printers we dealt with,” Shear recalls. “Markups were healthy in those days.” My, how things have changed. Many commercial printers have opted to bolster their

BINDERY matters
May 1, 2005

Show Shines for Manufacturers ORLANDO—With 150 exhibit spaces of machines and services at Orlando Graphics 2005, held in April, enthusiasm for 2006 has already been expressed with 98 percent commitment by this year's exhibitors. "The quality of visitors, not the quantity, is what generates business for us," says Hans Max, president and CEO of MBO America, an exhibitor at the show. "We were extremely satisfied not only with the immediate sales, but the followup sales and leads produced by Orlando Graphics." MBO ran demonstrations allowing visitors to see more than 20 multiple-machine configurations bringing improved production to the pressroom or bindery. There was excitement over MBO's

BINDERY matters
March 1, 2005

Marketing Alliance for Digital Finishing SANTA ANA, CA—Duplo USA announced the introduction of its DC-545HC slitter/cutter/creaser through Canon USA's Imaging Systems Group Alliance and Industry Marketing (AIM) program. This pairing of Canon digital color printing systems and Duplo finishing equipment will provide customers in the production and commercial printing marketplace with a streamlined solution for the finishing of short-run digital color print jobs. Duplo's DC-545HC provides complementary finishing features for documents printed on Canon imageRUNNER and CLC devices. By combining the functionality of multiple devices, the DC-545HC delivers value by reducing production time (single pass required, as opposed to multiple passes in multiple devices) and freeing

BINDERY matters
January 1, 2005

Finishing Supplier Changes Structure HANOVER PARK, IL—Gämmerler, a supplier of materials handling and in-line finishing equipment, is implementing a new global organizational structure designed to unify the company's resources to improve customer support on a global basis. This includes the formation of a senior level, global management team with collective responsibility for worldwide service, sales, marketing, finance, engineering and order management functions. Open House has Post-Drupa Flavor ROSELAND, NJ—In November, Bobst Group USA held its "Direction '04" open house, the North American launch and domestic premier of the 12 new products announced earlier this year at Drupa in Germany. During the three-day open house, U.S. converters

Floor-Model Folders — Getting into the Fold
October 1, 2004

by chris bauer Managing Editor Once overlooked in a printing world that focused heavily on digital technology, bindery equipment, including floor-model folding machines, can now be part of the conversation. Modern machines offer all of the automation that today's users desire. According to Josef Niehueser, product manager for Stahlfolder (distributed by Heidelberg), automation and integration are the features that folding machine users want to incorporate. The bindery is the only production department left that still involves a degree of manual labor, he points out, and printers want to take as much labor out of the finishing process as possible. "Integration is the next

drupa 04 Report Binding & Finishing — Building Better Binderi
June 1, 2004

by Dennis E. Mason The just-finished Drupa 2004 in Germany was unquestionably the most comprehensive graphic arts trade show in the world. Nowhere else but every four years in Düsseldorf can one see the breadth and depth of equipment, supplies, software and processes on display for two weeks. Although Drupas are dominated by the likes of Heidelberg, MAN Roland and KBA, with their particularly press-centric focus, it also provides a forum for companies that are far less well known, and for firms that only wish to be known. And while many journey to Drupa to see the latest in presses, or a complete

Mechanical Binding — Bound for Success
March 1, 2004

By Erik Cagle Senior Editor In one of many hilarious episodes from the long-running animated hit television series, "The Simpsons," bartender Moe Szyslak is hammering a crayon up Homer Simpson's nose to restore his less-than-Hawkingesque intelligence level to subpar standards. Don't ask why. During the hammering, viewers can witness Homer's digressing intelligence as the crayon is pushed deeper into his brain. At one point during the hammering, Homer mindlessly blathers, "de-fense, de-fense," but the deeper, more acceptable (and thus dumber) level Moe reaches with the crayon (it's called a "Crayola Oblongata") causes Homer to utter, "Extended warranty? How can I lose?" We'll not debate the merits of parts

Punching vs. Drilling — Holes And How We Make Them
March 1, 2004

by David Spiel A customer calls and says that he wants to buy a three-hole punch, but I tell him that he really does not. To avoid the risk of falling into an Abbott-and-Costello routine, I explain to him that a drill uses rotating drill bits to drill through paper and a punch uses reciprocating male and female dies to push through paper. A solid punch pin pushes paper through a female hole and the waste exits below. A drill cuts the paper while spinning and the waste is ejected up through its hollow shaft and exits through the top. What's the difference? Speed, accuracy, versatility