DIGITAL digest

New Tools Created to Educate Marketers About VDP Benefits

LYNBROOK, NY—To spur use of variable data printing, the Ad Age Custom Programs Group (a division of Advertising Age magazine), PRINTING IMPRESSIONS, Kodak and the U.S. Postal Service are working with TeleTime Video to jointly create a multi-platform communications effort that defines personalized marketing. Two key components are an interactive DVD and Webinar that will be available on the Ad Age Website (www.adage.com).

Variable data printing methods and successes are covered on the DVD, including case studies from companies that have experienced a dramatic ROI on personalized marketing campaigns. The greater relevancy of personalized direct mail pieces has been shown to increase response rates two to seven times compared to static content. Among the businesses highlighted in the case studies are Charles Schwab, Kodak, Verizon and Oceania Cruises.

The materials on the DVD and in the Webinar are intended to educate marketers—the media decision makers—on the advantages of variable data digital printing, says Harold Klein, president of TeleTime. The DVD is designed for use as part of customer and new prospect presentations, in training programs and for presentations at trade shows, he adds.

PRINTING IMPRESSIONS will promote the DVD through ads in future editions, along with banner ads and a video trailer on our Website (www.piworld.com). The USPS will be equipping its 1,000-person sales force with copies of the DVD to be used in consultations with marketers. Kodak will also distribute at least 1,000 DVDs to printers and marketers.

For more information on the program, contact Harold Klein at (516) 316-3798 or hklein@teletimevideo.com.

Double Digit Growth for Digital Color Investments

HANOVER, MA—Measured in terms of revenues from sales of hardware, media and chemistry, I.T. Strategies is forecasting the worldwide digital color market—ink-jet (both narrow and wide format) and electrophotography (EP)—to grow to $173 billion by 2010, up from $103 billion in 2005.

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