First Impressions are Overrated

Don’t let clichés get the better of you. You have heard it many times before…You only get one chance at a first impression.

people
A solid brand strategy would plan both the first impression and the many other interactions a prospective customer will have with the company through becoming a customer. A great brand strategy will anticipate customers’ primary interests so they can assist them completely. That’s what makes for strong customer relationships.

First impressions have been overrated. Think about the number of companies you have done business with over the years. Did you really decide which one to use and which not to solely based on a first impression? I really doubt it.

Instead, people judge who they are going to do business with based on:

• Is the company committed to bringing out the very best in each of my projects?

• Do they have a great working relationship with their employees and customers?

• Are they approachable and creative?

• Are they a leader?

• Is their story so compelling that I feel like telling others about it?

That’s the way most people judge companies. And it’s a lot more meaningful than a first impression.

Tom Wants to Hear Your Branding Issues:
If you are a printing company, or product/services company serving the industry, and would like to be considered for a feature in this blog, please contact Tom Marin for an interview.

Follow MarketCues on Twitter for branding and social media tips, as well as the latest trends. Tom also welcomes emails, new LinkedIn connections, calls to 407.330.7708 or visit www.marketcues.com. How can he help solve your branding issues?

Categories:

Tom Marin is the managing partner of MarketCues.com and provides corporate and brand strategy to organizations of all sizes. He has an extensive background in the graphic arts, printing, publishing and media industries. Marin is an accredited member of the national and international chapters of the Business Marketing Assn., is a (CBC) certified business communicator and a past marketing chair of the Chicago chapter.

Related Content
Comments