Open Enrollment | Subscribe to Printing Impressions HERE
Connect
Follow us on
Advertisement
 
TJ Tedesco

View from Mount Olympus

By TJ Tedesco

About TJ

T.J. is team leader of Grow Sales, Inc., a marketing and social media services company operating at the intersection of compelling content, clear vision and quality communication practices. In this blog, fire is a metaphor for print. Hang on, this ride will be weird...

Prometheus crept into Mt. Olympus, stole fire, returned to the lowlands, ran from house to house distributing it, got caught, was chained to a rock, lost his liver to a huge ugly bird and was rescued by Hercules. Leveraging his fame, Prometheus started Fire Enterprises Inc.  (FEI). Since fire was the hottest technology of the time, company success came fast and furious. Two generations later, fire isn't such an easy sale. Now led by Prometheus' grandson Org, FEI's growth is non-existent, competitors are pounding and prices are in the toilet.
 

The Tribe Discovers the Importance of ‘Shotgun’ Marketing

 
Last week, the FEI tribe learned how a strategic offer can drive better results for direct mail campaigns. This week Marka and Zoot shift gears with an overview of the differences between “shotgun” and “rifle” marketing activities (For historical accuracy, these are referred to as “catapult” and “arrow” marketing, respectively.) Remember, fire = print.

It was late Sunday afternoon and the yolky sun was setting behind Mount Olympus. Over a round of O-golf, Marka and Zoot discussed the differences between “arrow” and “catapult” promotional strategies. Several minutes into their discussion, Zoot admitted he didn’t understand the differences between the two.

“Remember the AIDAR curve from Marketing 101 at Olympus U?” Marka asked.

“Sure,” Zoot said. “Olympian consumers generally move through five stages on their way to making a purchase—Awareness, Interest, Desire, Action and Reordering.”

“When a new product or service hits the market, consumers first need to be moved through ‘Awareness’ and ‘Interest’ stages,” Marka continued. “‘Catapult’ marketing can be useful here.”

“Why?” Zoot inquired, as he whacked his tee shot off into the distance.

“Ooh, Zoot, you sliced the Hades out of that,” Marka raved. “Since ‘catapult’ vehicles offer a low cost per impression, they can be an effective way to raise market awareness levels across all of Olympus.”

“What are some examples of ‘catapult’ advertising vehicles?” Zoot asked.

Marka teed up and swung away. “Almost any form of mass media can be a catapult advertising vehicle, including:

O-radio,
O-TV,
O-papers,
O-magazines,
O-web and
O-billboards
.”

“At what point do ‘arrow’ promotional activities become better marketing investments?” Zoot asked, cleaning his driver with a monogrammed towel as they walked toward the green. “I’d think we’d always want to expose the FEI brand to the largest possible audience.”

They reached the green and Marka pulled out her putter. “Not always,” Marka explained. “‘Catapult’ activities are only cost-effective when a company needs to raise basic market awareness levels. Once prospects reach the Interest and Desire stages of the buying cycle, we need to expose them to compelling messages that are personal, informational and speak to their buying needs. I’ll tell you more about ‘arrow’ marketing—right after I sink this putt.”

Today’s FIRE! Point
A “shotgun” marketing approach is useful for raising the market Awareness levels of products, services and companies that lack broad name recognition. Successful “shotgun” programs will get your company’s selling proposition in front of many key business influencers in a short period of time.
 
FIRE! in Action
American Alliance of Ethical Movers Succeeds with Strategic “Shotgun” Campaign

The AAEM used ad space in a mover’s guide to offer a free moving quote. The result was a 42 percent increase in conversions over the company’s previous search engine marketing and direct mail efforts.

Next week: A discussion of the advantages of a more targeted “arrow” approach over a “catapult” strategy.
 

Industry Centers:

COMMENTS

Click here to leave a comment...
Comment *
Most Recent Comments: