Open Enrollment | Subscribe to Printing Impressions HERE
Connect
Follow us on
Advertisement
 
Chief Folding Fanatic

Trish Talks Finishing

By Trish Witkowski

About Trish

Trish Witkowski is Chief Folding Fanatic at the online community foldfactory.com. She holds a bachelor of fine arts degree in graphic design and a master of science degree in Graphic Arts Publishing from Rochester Institute of Technology's School of Printing Management and Sciences (now the School of Print Media).

An award-winning designer, Trish held the position of creative director for a Baltimore-based agency for six years, and has taught design and desktop publishing at the college level. She has a specialized expertise in the area of folding and is the creator of the FOLDRite™ system, a 2004 GATF InterTech™ Technology Award winner.
 
Trish frequently publishes articles for graphic arts industry publications, and has written three books on the topic of folding: A Field Guide to Folding, Folding for the Graphic Arts: A Teacher's Handbook, and FOLD: The Professional's Guide to Folding.

 

New RIMA Indexing Stacker Offers a Triple Threat of Quality, Speed and Economy

 
Get the Flash Player to see this rotator.
 
RIMA System is offering the new RS 34 indexing web press stacker, a mid-range full press-speed stacker capable of running at speeds in excess of 90,000 units/hour.

A Little Stacking History
There are currently three stack-building techniques—single-stage, multi-stage and indexing.

With the original single-stage stacking approach (originated by RIMA in the 1970s), products drop from the top of the stacker to one set of stacking “forks" and then into the bottom of the stacker and out.

In the next step in stacking evolution—the multi-stage stacking process—products drop from one set of forks to a second set, and finally to a third before exiting the stacker. This technique offers smaller drop distances, but there is still some dropping and loss of bundle integrity from fork to fork.

The newest, most advanced stacking technique is called Indexing, where one set of forks slowly descends (“indexes”) with the product from the top to the bottom of the stacker. This approach means there is no product drop during the building process, greatly improving final bundle quality, and enabling quality stacking of both lightweight (4 or 8 page) and heavy weight (96+ page) products. Most stacking systems purchased within the past four or five years are either multi-stage or indexing, however single-stage stackers are still on the market.

Watch a video of the RIMA System RS 34 to see indexing in action:



What’s great about the RS 34?
Besides the obvious quality advantages of the indexing technique, and the impressive running speeds, RIMA is offering its RS 34 indexing stacker at a very attractive price—about 25% less than other indexing stackers on the market.

Mark Legac, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at RIMA System, states, “Due to the fact that we have been able to implement some new manufacturing efficiencies, and that we manufacture the system in the United States so that it does not have the negative impact of the current dollar/Euro exchange rate, we are able to offer this exciting technology to our customers at an economical price.”

The RS 34 comes standard with a laser counter, divert gate for automatic copy rejection, stream aligner with side belts, squeeze roller, gapper, indexing upper bin unit, turntable with integrated stack compression, servo pusher and delivery table, with options for high infeed and rear bundle exit, if necessary. The servo pusher allows for improved cycle times and gentler bundle eject. These factors contribute to a higher-quality bundle, which means no need to manually re-jog bundles before placing them on the pallet.

For more information about the RIMA System RS 34, contact Mark Legac at 770-998-5622 x303, or m.legac@rima-system.net.

Industry Centers:

COMMENTS

Click here to leave a comment...
Comment *
Most Recent Comments: