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Tom Marin

Building Brands

By Tom Marin

About Tom

Tom Marin is the managing partner of MarketCues.com and provides corporate and brand strategy to organizations of all sizes. He has an extensive background in the graphic arts, printing, publishing and media industries. Marin is an accredited member of the national and international chapters of the Business Marketing Assn., is a (CBC) certified business communicator and a past marketing chair of the Chicago chapter.

 

Is Your Organization Communicating Effectively?

 
I can’t think of any organization that’s doing all that it could to communicate effectively with its customers. Even the giants such as Apple create communications problems by introducing products that are clearly not ready for prime time. Most organizations do not score above 85 percent in communications assessments, and that often includes giant corporations that have spread their communications across multi-geographies and divisions.

There’s always room for improvement. The difference between the winners and most other organizations is that the winners know how to assess how they are doing and make improvements. Make sure you are clear on what should be considered important so you don’t waste time on unimportant data and metrics.

Here are three essential rules for effective strategic marketing and communications:

1. Know what your customers need and want
. Know what interests them. Not just with regard to your products, but the products they use throughout their companies.

Kodak recently stated that it is working with clients on how to integrate Kodak products inside their organizations as well as integrating non-Kodak products into the mix. This is a huge step for Kodak, but one that should build trust with its customers because it is confident enough in its products and strengths to help customers with competitive products. A new way of doing business?

2. Use an easy-to-understand language to tell your story
. To often, marketing communications are written in the jargon of the selling organization, not the client’s language, and this always creates a negative boundary. It’s interesting to me that so often a company will announce its new website, which includes a new design, but use the same copy that appeared on the former website. By always using original and simple to understand messaging, clients will quickly know what you are saying and that will encourage them to read on.

3. Test your communications
. You can’t improve what you don’t measure, as the saying goes. Business marketing is no exception. Most organizations have not built in effective financial management that keeps score of what is and is not working. This helps explain why so marketing directors are often criticized and have a difficult time justifying their marketing expenditures. There are literally dozens of books written on this subject—ROI – Return on Investment. It is a practice that your Chief Marketing Officer should include in your marketing program.

A simple test of whether your marketing communications are on target is to ask yourself the following question: If I had to read this marketing copy, how would I rate it?
  • Enjoyable
  • Boring
  • Too technical
  • Not logical
  • Doesn’t flow well

If you find too many negative answers, it may be time to change your marketing strategy, and that should start with what your customers would really enjoy learning about.
 
Tom Wants to Hear Your Branding Issues:
If you are a printing company or product/services company serving the print-media market and would like to be considered for a feature in this blog, please contact Tom Marin for an interview.

Follow MarketCues on Twitter for branding and social media tips, as well as the latest trends. Tom also welcomes emails, new LinkedIn connections, calls to 407.330.7708 or visit www.marketcues.com. How can he help solve your branding issues?
 

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