Phil Riebel

Phil Riebel

Phil has over 28 years of international experience related to sustainability and the forest products industry. He currently leads Two Sides North America, a non-profit that promotes the unique sustainable features of print and paper, as well as their responsible production and use. Two Sides operates globally in five continents with members that span the entire graphic communication value chain. Phil has written extensively on sustainability and environmental topics related to the forest products sector. He received his Bachelor and Master’s of Science degrees from McGill University in Montreal. He is a private forest owner and sustainably manages over 200 acres of forestland for both recreational and economic benefits.

The Hidden Face of Digital

Every day we send email, navigate the Web and store our videos, photos or music in the Cloud. We often have the impression that the whole process is trivial and nearly free, but this is not at all the case. A recent Guide, La Face Cachée de Numérique, (The Hidden Face of Digital), reveals the widespread environmental impacts of the growing number of digital devices (increasing energy consumption, use of primary minerals, pollution and waste production) and how to reduce them. 

Top Five Greenwashers: Company #1 – American Water

In 2017, Two Sides North America is redoubling its commitment to holding companies to accurate and verifiable claims regarding the environmental footprint or “greenness” of paper-based versus electronic communications. As you know, we’ve already had tremendous success by working with leading Fortune 100 corporations to remove or change misleading anti-paper marketing messages, and avoid greenwashing consumers. As part of our renewed commitment we’re going to start highlighting the “Top Five Greenwashers” in this blog space.

The Carbon Footprint of Email (Is Quite Large!)

Establishing the exact amount of the CO2 produced by sending an email includes many variables: the energy it takes to move the email across the Internet, process it, view it, store it, reread it and, after some time, delete it. One email may indeed produce an insignificant amount of CO2 but when all those tiny footprints are measured at a global scale, the footprint becomes astonishing in size.

Survey Shows Some Positive Consumer Trends in Favor of Print

A multi-country survey on "The Attractiveness and Sustainability of Print and Paper" was conducted in June 2016 by global polling firm Toluna Inc. and showed some positive results on how people perceive and use print and paper. In general, there was a preference for print on paper across all age groups, likely indicating a more fundamental and more human way that people react to the physicality of print on paper.

Recently: A Popular New iPhone Photo App Exemplifies the Social Value of Print and Paper

In case you are not up to speed on the latest iPhone apps — here is one that really piqued my interest! It’s called "Recently" and it automatically creates a high-quality printed magazine with the most recent photos taken with an iPhone ... and mails it to you! In today's blog, I feature an interview with Scott Valins, young entrepreneur and founder of "Recently."

Many Americans Agree That 'Go Paperless - Save Trees' is Misleading and Ineffective

Results from a recent U.S. consumer survey suggest that the majority of Americans agree that print and paper can be a sustainable way to communicate when produced and used responsibly. In fact, it seems many people distrust and are not swayed by corporate green claims used to promote online services over paper. Here are my five favorite results from the June 2016 Toluna survey.

Paper Is Good for Learning and Is Sustainable

Last week, USA Today published a column entitled "Paper may be bad for trees, but it is good for people," by Tal Gross, an assistant professor at Columbia University. Here at Two Sides we could not agree more with the findings and statements related to the benefits of paper for education and learning.