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WOA 04 -- No Signs of Slowing Down

April 2004
By Erik Cagle

At the age of 82, you would think that a day at the office for F. Edward Treis would be a weekly drop-by around 10 a.m. for a cup of coffee and some handshakes with the sales force before returning home shortly after noon.

But the chairman of the board for Menomonee Falls, WI-based Arandell Corp. is hardly a figurehead. Sixty years after friends on a sailing holiday convinced him to give commercial printing a try, he is still involved with the day-to-day operations of the company.

Suffice to say, the ship has long since sailed on Treis ever retiring.

"I liked anything that needed creativity, and I have a weakness for searching for newer and faster ways of doing things," states Treis, chosen the 2004 winner of the Harry V. Quadracci VISION award by the Web Offset Association (WOA) and Printing Industries of America (PIA). "It used to be that technology would change in a 10-year time period. Now it seems like you have new changes monthly, or in a six-month period."

The VISION award is given to a heatset web offset industry executive, printer or supplier who has "reached an unsurpassed level of excellence and achievement in the industry—a leader who has gone far beyond the standard obligations to become a dominant force in shaping the business of heatset printing."

Past recipients of the award are Harry V. Quadracci, president and founder of Quad/Graphics, the inaugural winner in 1999; Roger Perry, former owner of Perry Printing (now Perry Judd's) in 2000; John Frautschi, chairman of Webcrafters (2001); Metroweb founder Thomas Brinkman Sr. and Sun Chemical Group Chairman Edward Barr were co-winners of the 2002 award; and Jerry Williamson, chairman of Williamson Printing, garnered the 2003 award.

The award was renamed in 2002 in honor of Quadracci following his untimely death earlier that year.

A 1995 Printing Impressions/RIT Printing Industry Hall of Fame inductee, Treis joined the sales department at R&L (later modified to the single word, phonetic match Arandell). Five years later, when the owner of the company returned from vacation and announced he had found a place to retire in California, a golden opportunity opened for Treis to purchase the company.

"He said I had a month to get it together," Treis recalls of the tight time frame.

Treis grew his business while embracing any form of technology that he thought would advance print quality. By 1981, the company had grown to become one of the largest lithographic sheetfed printers in Wisconsin, producing annual reports, brochures, inserts, labels and small publications.
 

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