WIRED Delivers First-Ever NFC-Enabled Print Advertisement

NEW YORK—March 21, 2012—WIRED announced that the first-ever magazine advertisement utilizing Near Field Communication (NFC) technology will appear in its April issue. Readers who own NFC-enabled Android smartphones can launch a mobile website allowing them to test-drive the new Lexus Enform with Safety Connect, Lexus’ in-car navigation and information service by simply placing their phone near the ad.

Once the NFC advertisement is activated, the user can explore the mobile website’s interactive videos that demonstrate Enform’s capabilities.

WIRED introducing the first NFC-enabled ad could only be made possible by bringing together the creative minds at Lexus with our reputation for pushing the envelope with emerging technologies and ideas,” said WIRED VP and Publisher Howard Mittman. “The WIRED world moves at an extraordinary speed, and this shows how we continue to work with our partners to ensure we all remain on the cutting edge.”

NFC chip technology continues to develop in smartphones allowing two-way communication between chip-enabled devices. The technology has most recently been used in developing payment systems and for location-based check in applications. This marks the first time the technology has been mass-produced in a magazine advertisement.

The advertisement for the all-new 2013 Lexus GS is part of a comprehensive marketing effort for the Lexus Enform with Safety Connect system which features voice-enabled apps allowing users to perform local searches with Bing, make restaurant reservations through OpenTable, and purchase movie tickets via MovieTickets.com.

Users also have the ability to check in with Facebook Places and search for business, shopping, restaurant and entertainment reviews on Yelp. Music lovers can tap into Internet radio with Pandora and iHeartRadio. The system is updatable and upgradeable through over-the-air downloads, so new apps and content can be readily added.

Source: Wired.

Comments
  • Rasta Witte

    How interesting. Most folks don’t know what NFC is or if their phone has reader to pick up the signal. I know know my blackberry doesn’t nor does my son’s andriod phone. It is essentially RFID technology. Let’s not drink to much cool aid folks as the vast majority of readers won’t even notice the tag let along be able to launch that app. How many folks subscribe to Wired now? 500,000 sub copies? If it works? Remember, most QR codes crash and burn by all accounts…

    Lets do a survey and see how many people access the NFC link:
    1%
    2%
    5%
    10%
    20%
    25%
    Above 25%?

    Still – 1% is a nice number on 500,000 but how many will actually buy a car?

    Don’t get me wrong – I love technology and the marriage between print and technology has to come but please make sure you take the right steps to make it work to that the user doesn’t reject it the next time it comes up…