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PRINTERS' PASTIMES -- Outside the Lines

September 2002
BY CHRIS BAUER


The trade press covering the printing industry, (Printing Impressions included) makes a lot of noise about converting to digital workflows, M&A winners and losers, and keeping a healthy bottom line in these trying economic times.

While this can be interesting and important from a business standpoint, the graphic arts industry is a huge employer, with many different personalities who have varied and unique interests outside of the printing world.

It is time their stories were told. PI found graphic arts executives with interesting pastimes to see how some people in the industry spend their time on weekends and after they leave their plants.

Wayne Womack
Midtown Printing & Graphics
Wayne Womack has been in the printing business all of his life. His parents started Lubbock, TX-based Pioneer Printing & Litho, a small offset shop, in 1958. Womack took over the business in the '90s with his parents still working as their hobby.

In 2001 he decided, like a lot of other small shops, that to continue to grow the business he would have to invest major capital to keep up with new technology. So he chose to merge the business.

Womack formed a partnership with John and Patty Frullo at Midtown Printing & Graphics, also in Lubbock. They had made an investment in a five-color, 14x20˝, direct-to-press Heidelberg GTO.

"My main attention is sales these days, leaving behind some of the jack-of-all-trades that a small owner must do to stay competitive," Womack explains.

This story is a common one in today's printing industry. Where things get interesting is outside of his profession.


Wayne Womack, of Midtown Printing & Graphics, tends to some of his herd of longhorn steer.
About 15 years ago, Womack, his wife Betty, sons Kevin and Dennis, and daughter Janet bought a small mixed herd of cattle. There was one longhorn female in the bunch, he recalls.

"We got to enjoying her calves so much we started looking more in-depth into the breed. We discovered that longhorn cattle have as much as three times the life expectancy of most breeds."

Womack did some quick math and realized that this equates to more offspring to sell. Longhorn steers also have such small birth weight calves, that they rarely ever have problems at calving time, he says.
 

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