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Paper Training For Printers

September 2002

 

Difference in Warehouse and Pressroom Temperature:

 

10°

15°

20°

25°

30°

40°

50°

60°

Paper in Rolls  

30˝ diam.

40˝ diam.

Length of time, in hours, paper should stand unopened:

15˝ wide

8˝ wide

5

9

12

15

18

25

35

54

30˝ wide

16˝ wide

8

14

18

22

27

38

51

78

60˝ wide

32˝ wide

11

18

23

28

35

48

67

100

 

64" wide

14

19

26

32

38

54

75

109



















































































































Acclimation Times for Paper in Cases or on Skids
  Difference in Warehouse and Pressroom Temperature:
  10° 15° 20° 25° 30° 40° 50° 60°
Cubic Volume of Paper on Skid or in Cases Length of time, in hours, paper should stand unopened:
6 Cubic Feet 5 9 12 15 18 25 35 54
12 Cubic Feet 8 14 18 22 27 38 51 78
24 Cubic Feet 11 18 23 28 35 48 67 100
48 Cubic Feet 14 19 26 32 38 54 75 109

96 Cubic Feet 15 20 27 34 41 57 79 115


3) Acclimate paper—If paper must be subjected to humidity and/or temperature changes, it should be allowed to acclimate to the new environment before processing. Acclimation time varies according to roll or case size and degree of change in temperature and/or humidity. (See charts)

Paper may endure severe temperature changes even in the short distance from an in-house warehouse to the printing floor. Acclimating paper after transport will result in optimal press performance and print quality.

4) Retain tracking information—Retaining proper identification with raw paper inventories and printed documents throughout the entire production process is essential. Commercial work can undergo many types of subsequent processing after the initial print run, including everything from forms conversion to digital printing. Therefore, it is critical that a substrate's identification information—such as product name, grade and lot number—be recorded on a ticket that is kept with the work throughout the entire production process. This will help with troubleshooting any problems that may crop up down the line. If given this information, paper mills can track problems and troubleshoot technical issues quickly and efficiently for the commercial printer and its customers.

5) Match the paper with the end-use application—A commercial printer that strictly does offset production may still need to consider the production requirements of other processes, such as digital printing. Many jobs—such as transactional statements, forms and newsletters—now leave an offset operation only to go right back into production in a digital department for customization and personalization. For these documents, it is necessary to use papers engineered for both digital and offset printing to ensure a high-quality end product. Considering the entire life of a document will help ensure selection of a paper that offers the best runnability and quality in all of the printing environments it will encounter.

If these few, simple precautions are taken in the selection, storage and in-process handling of paper, printers can go a long way toward ensuring trouble-free performance throughout the life of a document.

The above information was provided by Dennis Davey, a field technical service manager with Georgia-Pacific in Atlanta.
 

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