Printing What Matters

Sal Hernandez and Benjamin check an offset print job in Werner Printing & Engraving’s pressroom.

Werner Printing & Engraving executives: Standing (from the left) Ray Frick and Bob Werner. Seated: Debbie Pollard Pawlowski, Louis Werner and Bill Fitzgerald.

Harvey Benjamin (left) and Dave Szczepanik inspect a job produced on an automatic engraving machine at Werner Printing & Engraving.

Work is fed into an engraver by Gladys Rodriguez at Werner Printing & Engraving.

The world of engraving and specialty printing is intolerant of imperfections. Designers, professional firms—such as legal and finance entities—and business corporations rely on Werner for their engraved letterhead, business cards, marketing collateral and many other specialized paper products. Its ceremonial clients need invitations for weddings and Bar/Baht Mitzvahs, along with birth announcements. Government entities, from the mayor’s office up to the White House, require engraved printing for special events. Colleges, universities and other educational institutions rely on Werner for diplomas, invitations and various event announcements.

Quality Is Still Paramount

“We may be the last bastion of the true craft of printing,” notes Ray Frick, a 1999 Printing Impressions/RIT Printing Industry Hall of Fame inductee who was recently named company president. “As a society, we’re all drowning in e-mails and all things digital. Consequently, we’re now seeing a renewal of interest in the personal touch, the elegance and look of premium quality printing and engraving.”

According to Bob Werner—CEO of the firm founded by his grandfather Robert in 1921 and then run successfully by his father Louis—electronic invitations have their place, but it’s not in the consciousness of the clients that the company serves. “On the lower end, a lot more people are using the Internet and e-invites,” he says. “On the high end, people don’t want to go to (stock) catalogs anymore. They want the elegance of a custom invitation.”

Engraving only scratches the surface of Werner’s capabilities. Its printing capabilities feature manual and mechanical engraving, two- and four-color offset lithography, digital printing, thermography and Perma Raised printing, and letterpress printing. Adding sugar to the mix are value-added capabilities such as foil stamping, embossing (including blind embossing), diecutting, perforating, scoring and numbering.

Werner Printing & Engraving is a mix of old world printing art and craft complemented by digital technology enhancements. In the past year, the shop acquired a four-color Xerox 700 digital press along with a Halm Jet envelope press. The firm is also backed by robust Web-to-print online ordering capabilities, providing old school printing without the long turnaround times.

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